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2016 PA Forward Information Literacy Summit

Presentation Slides and Handouts for 2016 are coming closer to the July 21 event.

All Keynote Presentations

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Sowing the Seeds: High School Libraries Set the Stage for Agile Learning
Dr. Brenda Boyer
School Librarian and Instructional Designer, Kutztown School District

Workplace Information Literacy: A Crucial Component of Lifelong Learning
Russ Hall
Associate Librarian, Reference and Instruction, Penn State Behrend, Erie

Supporting Job Seekers in Public Libraries: From Traditional Services to Trauma Informed Awareness
Wes Roberts
Library Services Manager of Workforce and Economic Development, Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Keynote Video Recording Link  more ] E. Kavanaugh 8/3/2016
Boyer: Sowing the Seeds: High School Libraries PDF (1.56 MB)  more ] E. Kavanaugh 7/25/2016
Hall: Workplace Information Literacy PDF (1.71 MB)  more ] E. Kavanaugh 7/25/2016
Roberts: Supporting Job Seekers in Public Library PDF (1.09 MB)  more ] E. Kavanaugh 7/25/2016

Breakout 1.1 Assessing and Expanding Information

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Monica Rysavy and Russell Michalak

In the Fall 2015 semester, the information literacy (IL) team at a small private college delivered the second (Phase 1 data collection) and third (Phase 2 data collection) iterations of two survey instruments—the Information Literacy Assessment (ILA) and the Students’ Perceptions of Their Information Literacy Skills Questionnaire (SPIL-Q) in two phases. The first iteration of the two survey instruments was distributed in summer 2015 (Michalak & Rysavy, 2016). The purpose of this research was to determine students’ perceptions of their IL skills as compared to their actual test-assessed IL skills. The Phase 1 data collection consisted of delivering an online survey instrument to 1,851 undergraduate and graduate students (domestic and international). Using data gathered from Phase 1 for the Phase 2 data collections, the same survey instrument questions (ILA & SPIL-Q) were embedded in the asynchronous eLearning tool Microsoft Office Mix (Office Mix).
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 1.1 Assessing and Expanding Presentation PDF (986.15 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/27/2016

Breakout 1.2 A Lasting Learning Legacy

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Jennifer Hunter

Lifelong learning is crucial to staying competitive in today’s current workforce, particularly as it relates to technology and the speed with which information is disseminated and consumed. But what motivates people to take on the challenges of learning new skills, particularly when those skills may seem daunting or even completely out of reach? Social psychologist and Stanford Professor Carol Dweck has theorized that an individual’s mindset—fixed or growth—is a primary underlying factor for how one approaches a learning situation. A person with a fixed mindset believes that the amount of intelligence or talent one has is fixed and cannot be changed. A person with growth mindset, believes that intelligence is changeable and that one can improve. Fixed mindset does not lend itself well to behaviors that encourage learning, including grit and perseverance. Growth mindset, however, provides a foundation for resilience.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 1.2 Lasting Learning Presentation Slide PDF (226.29 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/13/2016
Breakout 1.2 Lasting Learning Slide Handout PDF (108.35 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/13/2016
Breakout 1.2 Lasting Learning Handout PDF (57.07 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/13/2016

Breakout 1.3 What Kind of Teacher

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Eloise Stevens, Diana Reed

Instructors and librarians alike often express disappointment in classes of students that don’t seem to think of themselves as learners. Many students are career-oriented and begin college thinking about their life after they leave. How can we tap into that self-concept to enhance the effectiveness of our information literacy training, and what can we learn from these students? How can their experiences in the library help them to develop professional learning skills that teachers need?

In ECE 201: Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education, second-semester first year students at our small liberal arts college are exposed to current theories of and topics in education and begin thinking of themselves as teachers. A research-based teaching philosophy template assignment served as the foundation for collaboration between instructor and librarian, as they worked together to transform the course integrated ‘one shot'.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
What Kind of Teacher Presentation Slides PDF (508.97 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016
What Kind of Teacher Assessment Data 15-16 PDF (77.86 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016
What Kind of Teacher Philosophy of Education PDF (134.1 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016
What Kind of Teacher Teaching Philosophy Template PDF (127.54 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016

Breakout 1.4 From Database Dumps to Top-Notch

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Liz Johns

Resource guides, subject guides, research guides, LibGuides, pathfinders - whatever name you use for them, they often end up being the same thing: lists of databases and resources meant to guide students to information. Such guides are often carefully curated collections of resources on specific topics, but they lack context and real integration as a learning tool. Traditional subject-specific research guides can be supplemented by how-to guides, but this solution does not always give users the instructions and learning opportunities at their point of need. However, by using the theory of constructivist learning and Richard E. Mayer’s (1996) SOI Model (Select, Organize, Integrate), guides can become more robust tools that not only connect users with the resources needed, but help them in learning new skills or information.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 1.4 Video Recording Link  more ] E. Kavanaugh 8/3/2016
Breakout 1.4 From Database Presentation Slides PDF (325.79 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016
Breakout 1.4 From Database Handout Rule of 3 PDF (264.13 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016
Breakout 1.4 From Database Handout Resource Select PDF (32.35 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016
Breakout 1.4 From Database Handout SOI Model PDF (684.44 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016

Breakout 2.1 I Can Google and Use a Smart Phone

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Betsy Reichart, Christina Elvidge

In an online school, digital literacy is an absolute necessity for first academic and second workplace success. In many cases, and for many students, the need is simultaneous. As a result, students begin to learn, sharpen and refine their digital literacy skills from day one. Such deliberate practice informs their learning, which they can parley into career and workplace skills. We’ve developed an information literacy course that provides a foundation in not only information literacy but also technological, social and communication literacies.

At Penn Foster we’ve begun to design programs that expand on these individual elements of information and digital literacy. Using the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education as a foundation, specifically “Authority is Constructed and Contextual,” “Information has Value,” and “Searching as Strategic Exploration,” we’re providing webinars and workshops.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 2.1 I can Google Presentation Slides PDF (277.06 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016

Breakout 2.2 Building Competence

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Theresa McDevitt

Students too often see the development of information literacy skills as having only academic applications and no relevance to their personal and work lives beyond the classroom. How can librarians at any level shape information literacy instruction to help students discover the workplace relevance of information literacy skills, while at the same time leading to deeper learning, critical reflection and compassion? Using information literacy based service learning assignments can be the answer. In this session participants will be introduced to the service learning via a short discussion of its definition, connection to high impact practices and a case study of its use in a library credit bearing class. Participants will then be invited to share their experiences with service learning assignments and then participate in an assignment building exercise.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 2.2 Building Competence Presentation PDF (600.27 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016

Breakout 2.3 Integrating the Information Literacy

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Victoria Raish, Patricia Hswe, Alessia Zanin-Yost

Successful integration of the Information Literacy Framework with workplace competencies requires consideration of what employers value, the information environment that students will be immersed in while in school and in the workplace, and changing assignments to reflect and evaluate these competencies. This session will draw upon a national survey on the information competencies valued in the workplace as well as how it is possible to change assignments students should complete. From the national survey that we distributed (n=114), employers ranked students’ ability to use free and open sources for gaining information and knowledge as 4.67 out of 6, where 6 denotes “very important.” Employers value when students have the ability to apply knowledge to real-world contexts and make connections between information [what?].
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 2.3 Video Recording Link  more ] E. Kavanaugh 8/3/2016
Breakout 2.3 Integrating IL Presentation Slides PDF (855.74 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016

Breakout 2.4 From OER to IL and Back Again

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Paul Bond

Discussions of open educational resources (OER) mainly focus on the economic benefits of free textbooks and the related benefits of improved students outcomes and increased retention. If we look beyond OER as textbook replacements to open pedagogy and open educational practices as potentially transformative advances in teaching and learning, we will see that information literacy plays a central role. Engaging in open educational practices and participating in an open educational environment requires information literacy skills. It is engaging in the process of creating information. It is engaging in the scholarly conversation and engaging in inquiry. It explores issues of authority and the value of information. Engaging in open educational practices exercises and develops information literacy skills as well, as learners find and evaluate information, and synthesize and present generated knowledge.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 2.4 From OER to IL and Back Presentation PDF (11 MB) E. Kavanaugh 7/20/2016

Breakout 3.1 Moving Beyond Finding or Searching

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Jennifer Jarson, Rachel Hamelers, Kelly Cannon

Information literacy instruction often focuses on the important goals of developing effective search techniques and finding relevant sources. Yet librarians’ information literacy aspirations for students reach further and deeper. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is an important lens that has helped us articulate and activate more complex learning goals for students. In this session, we will explore diverse examples of activities that enhance student learning, go beyond searching, and are connected to specific frames. One activity asks students to brainstorm the types of sources that could be used in a sample assignment and then rank those source types by authoritativeness in order to reflect on how Authority Is Constructed and Contextual.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 3.1 Video Recording Link  more ] E. Kavanaugh 8/3/2016
Breakout 3.1 Moving Beyond Presentation Slides PDF (1.74 MB) E. Kavanaugh 7/18/2016

Breakout 3.2 Creating Personal Social Media Guide

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Christina L. Wissinger

This session is designed to introduce literacy professionals to the concept of privacy literacy as an essential workplace and life skill. Social media guidelines used in the health care industry will be highlighted as a tool for teaching privacy literacy. Participants will learn about the various institutions that have social media guidelines in place for their employees and will learn how to use these industry guidelines to create a personalized social media guideline for use in their daily life. This session is designed to introduce the concepts of privacy literacy, digital literacy and social media literacy in a practical and tangible way by providing participants with an instructional activity that can be used to engage learners in the importance of ethical social media behavior and possible consequences of poor social media decisions.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Creating Personal Social Media Presentation Slides PDF (189.33 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016
Creating Personal Social Media Handout PDF (56.14 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016

Breakout 3.3 Fifteen to One Hundred and Fifty

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Tressa Snyder, Allen Morrill

Topics will include: Designing information literacy classes; Marketing library services to reluctant constituents; Information literacy and new core curriculum design; and Information literacy and student learning outcomes. We will apply what we have learned to future opportunities and future curriculum implementation we face at Thiel College. Participants will be able to learn from our missteps and successes, and apply them to their own unique library environments.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Fifteen to One Hundred and Fifty Presentation PDF (5.92 MB) E. Kavanaugh 7/7/2016

Breakout 3.4 Using Effective Feedback

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Maria Barefoot

Within the education literature, student motivation has been shown to be an important factor in student success. Formative feedback, defined as any assessment that is intended to improve learning, is a common method to try and increase student motivation and performance. This technique can also be used to empower students as self-regulated learners. However, in information literacy instruction, there is often little opportunity for formal feedback, and much of the feedback students receive comes from class dialogue or for one-on-one consultations after the students have left the instruction session. In these instances, students who are already motivated to ask questions or seek help afterwards are the only ones who benefit from individualized formative feedback. This study applies the principles of formative feedback to information literacy instruction in order to see if there is a measurable increase in student motivation to conduct research.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 3.4 Using Effective Feedback Presentation PDF (1.44 MB) E. Kavanaugh 7/14/2016
Breakout 3.4 Using Effective Feedback Survey PDF (84.89 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/14/2016

Breakout 3.5 From Flat to Flavorful

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Liz Johns

If you're having a hard time getting your message across, your handouts are falling flat, and your flyers are ending up in the trash, you may need a new approach to sharing information. Infographics could be the solution to grabbing and holding the attention of students, faculty, and users in the library and in the classroom. In this workshop, participants will learn to choose and present content in an infographic for use with their users. A basic understanding of what an infographic is and what it can be used for can help participants identify instances in their work in which they can reorganize and present information in different and creative ways, and better present information to their users. However, just because something can be turned into an infographic, doesn't mean that is should. Participants will learn to choose appropriate content, a meaningful infographic style, and organize it in a pedagogically sound fashion.
Item Name Posted By Date Posted
Breakout 3.5 From Flat to Flavorful Presentation PDF (6.13 MB) E. Kavanaugh 7/20/2016
Breakout 3.5 From Flat to Flavorful Instructions PDF (106.56 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/20/2016
Breakout 3.5 From Flat to Flavorful Examples PDF (1.68 MB) E. Kavanaugh 7/20/2016
Breakout 3.5 From Flat to Flavorful Planning PDF (62.93 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/20/2016
Breakout 3.5 From Flat to Flavorful SOI Model PDF (680.88 KB) E. Kavanaugh 7/20/2016

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